Why Your “About Us” Page Stinks

You’re proud of the work you’ve put into your B2B website.

The home page is lively and inviting. The products/services page is compelling and makes your value proposition crystal clear. Your marketing collateral, press releases and original content are all easy to find and download. Don’t pat yourself on the back just yet, though.

Take a look at your “About Us” page. Odds are it stinks.

It’s most likely a repository for bloodless company data — your mission statement, a code of conduct, the company’s history, the senior team’s bios. Sure, someone out there might actually look at some of this stuff every now and then … but it does nothing to convert site visitors into leads. Huge mistake. Your site and all of its contents should be designed to move visitors through the marketing and sales funnels. This includes your “About Us” page.

Rather than serve up the usual corporate gruel, why not share some compelling numbers? For example:

About Us

  • $55,000.00 — The average amount of money we saved clients last year.
  • 97% — Our current client satisfaction rating.
  • 35% — Percentage of the Fortune 500 we serve.
  • 20% — The average ROI we delivered to clients last year.
  • 10 — The average number of years we retain a client.
  • 5 — Number of service innovation awards we won last year.

Numbers like these tell a story — a far more engaging story than that told by a typical mission statement — and they give your visitors a strong reason to click the “Request a Sales Call” button.

If you don’t care for the numbers approach, try an accomplishments-oriented page. If you don’t care for that, try a page that tells your story using two-line client testimonials. The point is to transform your “About Us” page from a yawner into the vibrant marketing tool it should be.

Your “About Us” page should be about more than your company’s background. It should be about converting site visitors into leads.

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